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Welcome to the 20th Annual Brick & Click Conference (and our first time being 100% virtual) - we’re glad you’re here!

Want to learn a little bit about your host (B.D. Owens Library)? Take a look here

Conference Proceedings                                                                                             

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Friday, November 6
 

8:30am CST

Welcome
Friday November 6, 2020 8:30am - 8:50am CST

9:00am CST

Stacking it Up: A Textbooks on Reserve Program
The college affordability crisis is a reality most of our students face. Two years ago, Marymount University piloted a comprehensive textbook reserve program as a part of a multi-pronged effort to reduce the cost of higher education for our students. In this presentation we plan to discuss the lessons we have learned and provide attendees with the tools to start a successful reserves program. After attending this session participants will take away an adaptable timeline for implementing a textbook reserves program, outreach and marketing strategies, quantitative and qualitative measures for demonstrating the impact of a textbook reserve program, and a sense of the Return on Investment (ROI) on a textbook reserve program.

Speakers
avatar for Jenise Overmier

Jenise Overmier

Open Education Librarian Library, Marymount University
KB

Katharine Baldwin

Access and Outreach Librarian, Marymount University


Friday November 6, 2020 9:00am - 9:50am CST

9:00am CST

Neither Rain, Nor Sleet, Nor Gloom of Night: Maintaining Library Operations During a Large Scale Medical State of Emergency
In March 2020, the governor of one Midwestern state declared a State of Emergency after several individuals were diagnosed with COVID-19. Universities within the state quickly made the decision to suspend all face-to-face classes for a minimum of several weeks, with coursework to be carried on through online tools. In most cases, students were encouraged to leave campus; in some cases, students were actually required to leave campus with 24 hours’ notice. Initially (at the time of writing), campus services were expected to continue. This session will share the experiences of a multi-location library system at one institution.  Within the week following the emergence of COVID-19, the libraries began to piece together scenarios for:
  • Remaining available to faculty and students staying on campus [albeit without some student employees]
  • Developing procedures for making books, videos, and textbooks available to students who chose to leave the University for the duration of the emergency
  • Being sensitive to the needs of employees who belong to one or more high-risk groups or who have such individuals in their households
  • Quarantining materials received from areas where there is community transition of COVID-19
  • Preparing for the possibility that the institution will escalate to essential staff only or require some/all employees to work remotely
The question and answer portion of the presentation will include time for members of the audience to share their experiences with similar situations and to ask questions.

Speakers
avatar for Rob O'Brien Withers

Rob O'Brien Withers

Access Services Librarian, Miami University
I've worked in varying sizes of academic libraries (ranging from college to ARL) and in various types of positions (access services, technical services, web development, and a 10 year run as Assistant to the Dean. I've never found a library position that I didn't like. For the past... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2020 9:00am - 9:50am CST

9:00am CST

From the Wild West to Teamwork: Faculty-driven Acquisitions
An Acquisitions Manager, Liaison Librarian, and Director of Resource Services began their tenure braving the “wild west” of a faculty-driven collection using a twenty-eight year old collection development policy to complete a comprehensive, and overdue, review of a long-neglected collection. Learn how American academic library acquisitions have shifted from exclusively faculty-driven to librarian-driven collections with the rare exception of Kent Library at Southeast Missouri State University. Discover how a faculty-driven collection impacts policy, library engagement, and collection review. As we discuss the struggles and benefits of a faculty-driven collection, you will gain insights into how elements of this dynamic may be implemented in, and benefit, your library.

Speakers
avatar for Randyn Heisserer-Miller

Randyn Heisserer-Miller

Head of Collection Strategies, Colorado State University
Randyn Heisserer-Miller is the Head of Collection Strategies at Colorado State University. Previously, Randyn served as Acquisitions Manager for Kent Library at Southeast Missouri State University. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri, New England Conservatory of Music... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Hallam

Stephanie Hallam

Education Information Librarian, Southeast Missouri State University
I am the Educational Information Librarian at Southeast Missouri State University. In addition to being a subject liaison, providing reference, and teaching information literacy, I collaborate with faculty and students to locate and use open educational resources (OER).
avatar for Brad Reel

Brad Reel

Director of Resource Services, Southeast Missouri State University
MA Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Friday November 6, 2020 9:00am - 9:50am CST

9:00am CST

Interactive Introductions for International Students: Reworking How We Teach Information Literacy Skills to Our Students Far from Home
Do you not have the funds to create an international student reading center? Is your institution's international student orientation an opaque process? Are you worried about the glassy-eyed look international students give you when you try to show them how to search a database? Then do I have some tips and lesson plans for you. During this session, I will discuss my library's methods for improving our international student instruction and services on a shoestring budget at a small 4- year college.  Topics will include library orientation, research skills, plagiarism, and resource creation.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Hovinga

Kelly Hovinga

Instruction & Reference Librarian, Fort Hays State University


Friday November 6, 2020 9:00am - 9:50am CST

10:00am CST

When People Count: Leveraging Internal Resources to Develop a Program for Tracking Building Usage
Are you ever asked to report about library space usage using only door count? Or, are you paying for a generic people count system?  B.D. Owens Library, at Northwest Missouri State University, partnered with our School of Computer Science and Information Systems to develop a homegrown people-count system utilizing student interns.  Our “Head Count” program has expanded our ability to demonstrate more than just how many visitors come and go, but how many visitors come and stay. This session will cover the light-bulb moment, partnering efforts between departments, intern supervisory challenges, the implementation process, the impact of the data, and future plans for the program. Session attendees will be able to view our program in action and view sample reports we are able to generate from the data.

Speakers
avatar for Terra Feick

Terra Feick

Assistant Library Director, Access Services, Northwest Missouri State University


Friday November 6, 2020 10:00am - 10:50am CST

10:00am CST

Psychological Safety and Building Effective Teams
Teamwork is key to the functioning of any library, especially those that serve academic institutions. This was true in 2004 when “Building Teams: Making It Work!” was presented at Brick & Click Libraries and it is equally true today.  One factor that is extremely important for effective teams is psychological safety, which Amy Edmondson an expert on the subject defines as “a shared belief held by members of a team that the team is safe for interpersonal risk taking.” While “Building Teams” focused on the inner workings of teams from a team member perspective, this presentation will focus how library administrators can build more effective teams by building psychological safety within their organizations. The outcomes of NYU Libraries’ recent psychological safety work and the Libraries’ specific recommendations for creating psychological safety within academic libraries will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Kara Whatley

Kara Whatley

University Librarian, Caltech
DC

Deborah Caesar

HR Talent & Acquisition Specialist, New York University
AW

Amanda Watson

Librarian for English and Comparative Literature, New York University


Friday November 6, 2020 10:00am - 10:50am CST

10:00am CST

Teaching into the Gray Areas: Designing Learning Activities that Encourage Higher Order Thinking and Research Skills
All too often, our library instruction sessions seem to wind up bogged down in the (boring) details of database mechanics rather than on the more nuanced critical thinking and evaluation skills that we ultimately want our students to master. Come to this session and learn how to work with teaching faculty to incorporate challenging learning activities into sessions while still meeting the basic informational needs and source requirements of the typical college level research assignment. There will be a brief showcase of two sample activities and then attendees will work together to design a critical thinking exercise that can be taken back and used in their own classrooms after the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Virginia Cairns

Virginia Cairns

Instruction Librarian, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Instruction Librarian, interested in critical thinking, nontraditional assignments, partnering with teaching faculty.


Friday November 6, 2020 10:00am - 10:50am CST

10:00am CST

Unlocking Online Escape Rooms for Library Instruction
Trying to put active learning in information literacy instruction? Escape rooms are interactive, context driven games where players use a series of clues to solve puzzles, open locks, and reach freedom! Games are usually timed and playable in a physical room, on a tabletop, and even online. Like physical escape games, online escape rooms support personal and academic skill development including teamwork, communication, time management, information literacy, problem solving, and thinking on the spot. During this session attendees will explore the basic types of escape games and escape room components with a focus on online escape room development using Google Sites Forms.

Speakers
SC

Sean Cordes

Instruction Services Coordinator, Western Illinois University


Friday November 6, 2020 10:00am - 10:50am CST

10:00am CST

We Did It, You Can Do It, too: In House Digital Preservation
This presentation outlines the steps taken by Wichita State University Libraries’ Technical Services to implement a digital preservation workflow. These same steps can be adapted by other institutions since simple, open source tools were implemented. Four tools in particular, Data Accessioner, DA Metadata, Bagger, and Fixity were found to achieve the goals set forth by the University Libraries’ Digital Preservation Policy. The library’s priority was to preserve manuscripts and printed textual materials and enable access to their digitized and born-digital collections. These tools helped ensure file integrity, were easily implemented, and focus on ingest, processing, and maintenance of digital objects.

Speakers
SH

Samantha Henning

Digital Preservation & Government Document Specialist, Wichita State University


Friday November 6, 2020 10:00am - 10:50am CST

11:00am CST

Library Collaboration with the Smithsonian: World War I Lessons and Legacies Exhibit
The Smithsonian’s “World War I (WWI): Lessons and Legacies” poster exhibition was awarded to a Midwestern library. This presentation discusses lessons that can be learned from the collaboration and programming of the Outreach Services Librarian with the Library Arts Exhibit Curator to promote an 8-poster series that explores the history of the war and its lasting impacts on American lives to the university and wider community. A set of programming activities involving collaboration with various university departments led to a lecture series, open house, and a worksheet/scavenger hunt for class assignments. Displays relevant to WWI were showcased throughout the library displaying artifacts, photographs, clippings, and other rare historical items pertaining to WWI. As well, the library displayed books, DVDs, and other materials related to WWI and encouraged lecture series attendees to check them out. The Smithsonian poster series became an important educational foundation for our campus as faculty incorporated these posters, lecture series, and open house in their classes. This presentation discusses steps taken to create our library’s successful collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution and various university departments to better promote our library and its services.

Speakers
avatar for Leila June Rod-Welch

Leila June Rod-Welch

Librarian, Saddleback College
Leila June Rod-Welch, Ed.D. is a librarian at Saddleback College where she coordinates outreach activities. Previously, she worked at the University of Northern Iowa. Prior to that, Rod-Welch taught English to international students, refugees, and immigrants. The majority of her research... Read More →
avatar for Julieann Beddow

Julieann Beddow

Library Assistant III, University of Northern Iowa


Friday November 6, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am CST

11:00am CST

Cracking the Code: Building an Assessment Plan with Student Discussion Boards
How do we know what we teach is actually sticking? Librarians at UMKC developed an assessment process to determine effectiveness of library instruction sessions by seeing what students think when looking for sources after time in the classroom. Students were asked to find two sources, one scholarly and one popular. Questions on a discussion board in Canvas asked students to describe where they searched and identify the credibility and relevance of what they found. Using OpenRefine and Google Forms, the librarians extracted data and analyzed student responses to identify trends for updating lesson plans. The findings were not what was expected! In this session, participants will hear about what drove us to go against traditional rubrics and surveys and get a taste of coding a discussion board.

Speakers
avatar for Anthony Rodgers

Anthony Rodgers

Academic Library Fellow, University of Missouri-Kansas City
he/him; they/them I am finishing a Master of Library and Information Science degree from the University of Missouri with an emphasis in archives and records management this fall. I currently work in instructional design and reference at two academic libraries and will talk to anyone... Read More →
avatar for Courtney Strimel

Courtney Strimel

Academic Library Fellow, University of Missouri-Kansas City
I am currentlly an Academic Library Fellow at UMKC University Libraries in Kansas City, MO. I plan to graduate with my MLIS in December and hope to continue working in an academic library setting.


Friday November 6, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am CST

11:00am CST

The Librarian’s Guide to Zines for Classroom and Community
Zines continue to benefit from a resurgent interest from their 1990s heyday, including in libraries. A zine can serve as a pedagogical tool and are a low-cost addition to collections and programming in libraries. Over the course of three semesters, UNO librarians have collaborated with faculty on zine creation as a creative alternative to a typical research paper project for a course.  Creating zines as an assignment presents students with the opportunity to demonstrate research skills, exercise creativity, express compassion and empathy, and other outcomes. The UNO Libraries also collects and supports the creation of zines as part of efforts to democratize the archives and engage with users in different ways. This presentation will introduce an overview of zines, the pedagogical uses of students authoring zines, avenues for outreach and advocacy, and outcomes.

Speakers
AS

Amy Schindler

Director of Archives and Special Collections, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Amy Schindler (she, her) is an archivist and has been the Director of Archives and Special Collections at the University of Nebraska at Omaha Libraries since 2014. Previously, Amy held appointments in academic archives in the Mid-Atlantic region as well as holding contract positions... Read More →
avatar for Monica Maher

Monica Maher

Online Learning & Education Librarian, University of Nebraska Omaha
avatar for Claire Du Laney

Claire Du Laney

Outreach Archivist, University of Nebraska at Omaha


Friday November 6, 2020 11:00am - 11:50am CST

11:01am CST

Anti-Vaxxers, Sasquatch DNA and Other “Scientific” Findings: Actively Engaging Distance Students in Media Literacy
Developing media literacy skills for distance students without access to the physical library can be a challenge when for-credit and required library courses are not feasible. This presentation will outline a remote media literacy workshop held periodically at Athabasca University Library, an open, distance university library. Focusing on active learning this session works to engage students from both academic and non-academic backgrounds to evaluate internet resources. This presentation will discuss successful participation strategies, event promotion, teaching techniques, and areas for future development.

Speakers
avatar for Joanna Nemeth

Joanna Nemeth

Instruction & Reference Librarian, Athabasca University
Joanna Nemeth (MLIS, BA) is the Instruction & Reference Services Librarian at Athabasca University, she previously worked as the Digital Literacy Librarian for a term contract. She focused on creating teaching tools and providing inclusive instruction to the unique student body of... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2020 11:01am - 11:16am CST

11:16am CST

The Genesis of a Conduct Policy in a Medium-Sized Academic Library
Some of the more noticeable differences between a public library and an academic library have to do with aspects like noise level, the absence of children, and the cross-section of society that frequents a public library. Generally speaking, behavior-related issues are not part of the conversation in an academic library. However, a couple years ago, it was a behavioral issue from a member of the community that became glaringly apparent in Southeast Missouri’s Kent Library. “Oh no!! A community patron whose conduct doesn’t come under the same rules and regulations of the university’s Student Code of Conduct! What do we do??” Most librarians figure that any overt reprimand for misbehavior needs to be backed up with some kind of policy, especially if the consequences involve banning the patron or a course of action where retribution might be involved. And the policy needs to be something that can be pointed to on the website! In my role as Director of Public Services at Southeast Missouri State University’s Kent Library I took it upon myself to address this problem. Hence, the genesis of a conduct policy in a medium-sized academic library!

Speakers
avatar for John Baken

John Baken

Director of Public Services, Southeast Missouri State University
ACCESS SERVICES, INFORMATION SERVICES, INFORMATION LITERACY


Friday November 6, 2020 11:16am - 11:31am CST

11:32am CST

All Good Things Must Come to an End: When Library Staff and Patrons Pass Away
Over the years, one library has worked with survivors of patrons who have passed away, sometimes unexpectedly. Within the interval of a few months, the library had to respond to the unexpected deaths of several library employees, one of whom was a circulation desk supervisor. Beginning with established but unwritten policies for deceased patron, the library improvised responses. This session will share our experiences in piecing together our response to the loss of these staff members. Issues we have addressed have included: communicating with family, disposition of personal property at work, processing timecards, and identifying/tracking/handing off work in process at the time of the staff member’s passing. The question and answer portion of the presentation will include time for attendees to share experiences and ask questions.

Speakers
avatar for Rob O'Brien Withers

Rob O'Brien Withers

Access Services Librarian, Miami University
I've worked in varying sizes of academic libraries (ranging from college to ARL) and in various types of positions (access services, technical services, web development, and a 10 year run as Assistant to the Dean. I've never found a library position that I didn't like. For the past... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2020 11:32am - 11:47am CST

12:00pm CST

Lunch Break
Our stomach's are definitely growling... see you back here in an hour. 

Friday November 6, 2020 12:00pm - 12:59pm CST

1:00pm CST

Summer in the Stacks: A Weeding Experience Between Faculty and Library
In the summer of 2019, Spiva Library embarked on a project called Summer in the Stacks. The goal of the project was to engage faculty in evaluating and weeding library collections in certain subject areas. Join us to learn how the librarians across departments teamed up to assess the collections, how faculty members were involved to make the weeding decisions, and how part-time staff and student employees played their roles in the project. We will talk about challenges and tips for performing the joint efforts, in addition to sharing our tips and tricks of using Create Lists, Excel and macros.

Due to the success of the Summer in the Stacks, we have decided to continue with the project throughout the regular semesters, so that more faculty members can participate in reviewing and evaluating the library collections to make the library resources better support their curriculum.

Speakers
HL

Hong Li

Electronic Resources and Discovery Librarian, University of Tennessee at Martin (UTM)
avatar for Kayla Reed

Kayla Reed

Systems Librarian, MSSU


Friday November 6, 2020 1:00pm - 1:50pm CST

1:00pm CST

Object Oriented vs Function Oriented Programming - Library Instruction in a Bite-Sized Functional Model
"Object Oriented" (OOP) and "Function Oriented" (FOO) programming are two popular models of computer programming. Whether we realize it or not, they are also popular models when teaching our students library skills and information literacy. This session will dive into what that actually means, and how over the past few years of teaching research skills in foundational English courses, we have actually transitioned from an object oriented model to a functional model and made old things, like the Library Scavenger Hunt, new again. All of this while using bite-sized, foundational, functional, and mutable skills to freshman students.

Speakers
avatar for Billy Moore

Billy Moore

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Concordia University
I've been the Reference and Instruction librarian at CUNE for 5 years now. I have been teaching myself as a hobbyist programmer for a little over 2 years. I have a lot of interests and hobbies, all of which fall under various "nerd" categories, but I also have 3 kids under the age... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2020 1:00pm - 1:50pm CST

1:00pm CST

Student Engagement: Exploring Primary Sources in the Library of Congress in an Online Course
In an effort to broaden students' exposure to primary sources in an information literacy course, faculty librarians added an assignment to an information literacy course. The assignment required online students to virtually explore the Library of Congress website to discover an intriguing topic and share it with classmates in a discussion board forum. Participants in this session will view two videos and learn details of the specific assignment that has enlivened information literacy for often reluctant students.

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Ridlen

Peggy Ridlen

Reference & Instruction Librarian, Fontbonne University


Friday November 6, 2020 1:00pm - 1:50pm CST

1:01pm CST

If "They" Build it, "They" Will Come
Pius XII Memorial Library has a history of partnering with many independent units of campus. One of the most successful partnerships is with the Student Government Association (SGA). This lightening round will discuss ceding some library control to students and the positive ROI of sharing that control for policies, procedures, and spaces. The partnership between students and the library staff has always existed – ten years ago the library began 24/5 hours due to an agreement with SGA, the University President, and the Provost. In the last four years, the relationship with SGA has become even more important with students determining and funding equipment purchases and their loan rules, requesting dedicated library spaces for events and fundraising, and even funding a Wellness room in the library. Student agency with library issues is valued by both SGA and the library and is noticed and recognized by senior administration.

Speakers
avatar for Martha Allen

Martha Allen

Assistant Dean for User Services, Saint Louis University
I love libraries!


Friday November 6, 2020 1:01pm - 1:16pm CST

1:16pm CST

Save the Earth - Earth Day Game Drive: Small Steps, Big Impact
This session details the creation of a loanable board game collection at a university library. It will examine the results of a brief student survey regarding a library game collection, its location, game recommendations, and further development of this collection. Game collections can provide stress-relieving activities; students are encouraged to play games within the library and check them out. Library game collections give students an alternative for healthy leisure activities instead of going to a bar to socialize. Implementing a board game collection may lead to weekly game nights in the library and offer a safe and friendly place for gaming clubs to hang out.

Speakers
avatar for Leila June Rod-Welch

Leila June Rod-Welch

Librarian, Saddleback College
Leila June Rod-Welch, Ed.D. is a librarian at Saddleback College where she coordinates outreach activities. Previously, she worked at the University of Northern Iowa. Prior to that, Rod-Welch taught English to international students, refugees, and immigrants. The majority of her research... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2020 1:16pm - 1:31pm CST

1:32pm CST

Universal Design and Accessibility: A Checklist for LibGuides and Online Tutorials
What is Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning? What best practices do you regularly implement to make your LibGuides and online learning objects accessible? Do you use a checklist? Participants will examine the seven principles of Universal Design and nine principles of Universal Design for Learning. Participants will discuss developing an accessibility checklist for LibGuides and online learning objects. This session will also give participants a chance to share share ideas for UD and UDI.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney Mlinar

Courtney Mlinar

Head Librarian, Elgin campus, Austin Community College District


Friday November 6, 2020 1:32pm - 1:47pm CST

2:00pm CST

Making it Easy to Read Harder: Implementing a Reading Challenge at a Community College
Many of us likely have a reading goal we set for each new year like clockwork. But how can libraries encourage students to get as excited about reading new and different materials as we do? At the Penn Valley branch of Metropolitan Community College, the library adapted Book Riot’s popular Read Harder Challenge and created a year-long program to encourage exploration of the library collections and increased elements of diversity and inclusion. With reading suggestions from various sources and prizes (of course), this program started as an idea for a book display and has morphed into something much larger for the library.

Speakers
AF

Amy Fortner

Library Manager, Metropolitan Community College-Penn Valley
avatar for Anthony Rodgers

Anthony Rodgers

Academic Library Fellow // Library Circulation Attendant, UMKC // MCC-Penn Valley
avatar for Gwen Wolfe

Gwen Wolfe

Faculty Librarian, MCC-Penn Valley


Friday November 6, 2020 2:00pm - 2:50pm CST

2:00pm CST

Library Associates: Professionalizing Student Employment
The Library Associate program at Hendrix College offers select student assistants a more professionally modeled work environment. Library Associates learn skills they will take with them into a wide array of professional workplaces. Meanwhile, the library benefits from their increased engagement and creative input into its operations and services. The library has also contributed more to campus-wide focus areas, such as NACE’s career readiness competencies. In this session the presenter will discuss her experiences in creating and implementing this model. Attendees will brainstorm and discuss strategies they might implement at their libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Janice Weddle

Janice Weddle

Assistant Librarian for Instruction and Outreach, Hendrix College
Janice Weddle has worked at Hendrix College’s Olin C. Bailey Library since 2017, where she oversees the library’s public services and the Library Associates program for student workers as the Assistant Librarian for Instruction and Outreach. She has worked in libraries throughout... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2020 2:00pm - 2:50pm CST

2:00pm CST

Beyond the Humanities: Archives Instruction for Science and Medicine
Learn how to engage disciplines outside the humanities in primary source literacy. The archivist will present two case studies focused on teaching archives to science and medicine students, then discuss how to adapt the active learning methods used for other topics.

The archivist guided a healthcare class in examining relevant sources from the 1918 flu pandemic; students distilled learning into social media posts. The History of Science and Medicine students produced podcasts analyzing primary sources, with the archivist as both technical guide and information literacy coach.

Speakers
avatar for Laurinda Weisse

Laurinda Weisse

University Archivist and Digital Repository Manager, University of Nebraska at Kearney


Friday November 6, 2020 2:00pm - 2:50pm CST

2:00pm CST

Building a Teaching Strategy Toolkit to Engage Learners
According to Terry Doyle, "the one who does the work does the learning." How much effort does your average instruction session require of your students? This is the question of engagement. While good teaching takes time, good learning does, too! During this session participants will examine and discuss evidence-based teaching strategies which engage students and deepen student learning. Participants will also discuss best practices for instruction librarian training and building a community of learners with librarian colleagues.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney Mlinar

Courtney Mlinar

Head Librarian, Elgin campus, Austin Community College District


Friday November 6, 2020 2:00pm - 2:50pm CST

3:00pm CST

Puppies and Kitties OH MY!: Partnering with a Local PETPALS Organization
A Midwestern university library has partnered with a local PETPALS organization every semester for several years to reduce the stress and anxiety amongst students during finals week. This de-stressing activity is well received by students, faculty, staff, and even community members, bringing many visitors to the library. This session describes detailed instructions for Puppies and Kitties OH MY!: Partnering with a Local PETPALS Organization in order to lower student anxiety, lift spirits, and combat depression during finals week. In addition, event survey results will be shared along with tips on how to work with community partners.

Speakers
avatar for Leila June Rod-Welch

Leila June Rod-Welch

Librarian, Saddleback College
Leila June Rod-Welch, Ed.D. is a librarian at Saddleback College where she coordinates outreach activities. Previously, she worked at the University of Northern Iowa. Prior to that, Rod-Welch taught English to international students, refugees, and immigrants. The majority of her research... Read More →
JA

Jordan A. Newburg

Graduate Student, Washington State University


Friday November 6, 2020 3:00pm - 3:50pm CST

3:00pm CST

Fostering Success for New Faculty Librarians
Drawing on the experiences of a new faculty librarian with a management background, this session will share practical steps to position new graduates and mid-career changers for success as tenure-track faculty librarians. The session will cover three major themes: promoting tenure success, job-specific mentoring, and protecting time and space for networking, scholarship, and professional development. Attendees will receive a checklist of support mechanisms as well as sample plans and policies they can use to jumpstart the planning and implementation process at their institutions. Active learning enables attendees to begin high-level planning immediately, starting with an evaluation of their institution’s approach to librarian faculty success.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Bleier

Karen Bleier

Collection Management & Resource Sharing Librarian, Park University


Friday November 6, 2020 3:00pm - 3:50pm CST

3:00pm CST

Spectral Tales: Lessons Learned from Being Ghosted by Faculty
Have you ever built a great online module or LibGuide only to have the collaborating faculty vanish after it’s finished?  How about when you design an awesome student or faculty workshop as part of a campus-wide series only to have an empty classroom? Faculty who are gone with the wind after the tutorial makes assessment and feedback nearly impossible. Likewise, how do you gather meaningful data from just one workshop participant? As a follow-up to our “Ghosted by Faculty” (Brick & Click 2017) presentation, come hear how we’ve adjusted our curriculum, policies, and work procedures to mitigate both face-to-face and online ghosting.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Blackburn

Heidi Blackburn

STEM and Business Librarian, University of Nebraska at Omaha
I serve as the STEM and Business Librarian at the University of Nebraska Omaha Criss Library. My research interests focus on the status of women in STEM in higher education and active learning in information literacy classrooms.
avatar for Tammi Owens

Tammi Owens

Outreach and Instruction Librarian, University of Nebraska at Omaha
avatar for Meghan Salsbury

Meghan Salsbury

Instructional Technology Librarian, Montana State University Library


Friday November 6, 2020 3:00pm - 3:50pm CST

3:00pm CST

Making the Most of Libapps
Many libraries are utilizing LibGuides for their institution. But what about the other LibApps? After our Systems Librarian left in 2019, I took over the LibApps and got to explore a whole world of potential. In exploring LibGuides, I also grew familiar with functions of LibAnswers, LibCal, LibWizard and even a little LibStaffer. What I found is that the library was not using these tools to their full potential. Through LibApps, the library was able to house our forms and surveys, collect more data for library usage, and improve services.

Speakers
avatar for Kayla Reed

Kayla Reed

Systems Librarian, MSSU


Friday November 6, 2020 3:00pm - 3:50pm CST

4:00pm CST

Wrap-up/Networking/Prize Drawings
Meet us here to wrap up the day!  We will also be drawing for prizes but need not be "present" to win. 

Friday November 6, 2020 4:00pm - 4:30pm CST
 
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